Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY SPORTS

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

U.S. Army veteran Bryan Fant was a helicopter crewman suffering from service-connected neck and back pain. After 17 years of service and three months in rehab, he was discharged from the Army and on the brink of a downward spiral. He alienated his friends and family, he was suicidal, and he was hospitalized following a seizure derived from overmedication, fatigue, and malnourishment.

He decided to make a change. He quit using pain medication and switched to medicinal cannabis — and yoga.


MIGHTY SPORTS

Here are 7 steps to six-pack abs

Let’s be real: Six-pack abs are a pretty dumb fitness goal. First and foremost, having a stomach that has ridges is not a barometer of health. In fact, in many ways it is quite the opposite. To have six-pack abs you need to have somewhere around the order of 6% body fat. Sounds good, right? Not exactly. Extremely low body fat (that’s below 5%) can put a strain on the system, causing testosterone to drop, the immune system to struggle, brain fog, splotchy skin… the list goes on. In other words, this is a vanity goal.

So you still want to give one a go? We get it, that six-pack is aesthetically pleasing and make anyone look damn good in a swimsuit. But be prepared to work for it. There is a very high bar you’ll need to hit repeatedly for workout dedication and dietary discipline.


So the first step to a six-pack is watching what you eat, and sticking to lean meats, vegetables, and cutting out all sweets and most carbs. The second step is committing to an intense ab-focused strength-training routine — not the twice a week deal you do now, but three to four times a week, with determination and focus — to see your abs transform themselves. The good news: Many of the moves don’t require machines or extra weights, so you can do them in the convenience of your own home.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

(Photo by Alora Griffiths)

The final ingredient to building your six-pack is a solid dose of daily cardio. Developing your overall fitness will help train your body to use energy more efficiently, and teach it to start torching calories the minute you begin to move. And that’s key because you can have the strongest abdominals in the world, but if they’re covered with a layer of fat, you’ll never see them.

Follow this 7-point checklist to take your six-pack fantasy one step closer to reality.

1. Eat less fat, and more protein.

Protein helps your body build muscle and recover from tough workouts. It also has the highest thermogenic property of the various food categories (carbs, fat, etc), meaning pound per pound it requires more energy to burn, helping you lose weight faster.

2. Count your calories.

Yes, your meals should be filled with high-quality nutrients and low on processed crap. But at some point, a calorie is a calorie, and to lose weight, you need to take in fewer calories than you expend. The average guy needs about 2,500 calories to maintain his weight. Shoot for 200 less than that a day to help hit your target safely. (For easy reference, that means cutting out the bowl of chips before dinner, or skipping dessert.)

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

(Photo by Chris Lawton)

3. Pick exercises that hit multiple muscle groups.

Crunches and sit-ups have their place, but exercises that involve multiple muscle groups give you more bang for your buck. Two of the best ones, which should be performed to the point of temporary muscle failure (i.e., you cannot do another rep), are planks and reverse crunches.

Plank: Start lying face-down on the floor, torso propped up on your elbows. Engaging your core, raise your body up onto your forearms and toes, making sure your body forms one long line from shoulders to feet. Hold this position as long as you can, working your way up to 90 seconds.

Reverse crunches: Lie on the floor on your back, knees bent at 90 degree, feet raised several inches off the ground. Contract your abs and hike hips off the floor, keeping your spine rounded. Raise knees high toward the ceiling. Relax and repeat as many times as you can.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

(Photo by Julia Ballew)

4. Make your cardio workouts more intense (and shorter).

Cardio is an essential component to getting your six-pack, because it speeds up the weight-loss process. Despite what you’ve probably read about moderate intensity cardio being the best method for burning fat (which is true), the fastest way to achieve overall calorie burn is HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training), which goes like this: 60 seconds of biking, rowing or sprinting as hard as you can, followed by 30 seconds of rest. Repeat 10 times.

5. Hanging leg raises. 

Don’t be fooled by its name — hanging leg raises are one of the best abdominal workouts you can do. The move works those deep, lower abdominal muscles that basic exercises like crunches miss. Start by hanging from a bar, legs straight. Engage your core and raise both legs straight in front of you (if this is your first time, it’s likely you will not be able to lift them very high — that’s OK). Repeat until failure.

6. Prioritize hydration.

It’s true, all the water in the world isn’t going to make your abs pop overnight. But it’s also true that drinking at least 8 glasses of water (or other non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated beverages) a day helps boost your energy levels so you can commit to your next workout. It also helps prevent water retention, which can give your gut a bloated appearance.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

(Photo by henri meilhac)

7. Vary your routine.

Even though you’ll need to do some ab-specific exercises along with general strength and cardio work, you’ll see better results if you alternate the moves you do, as each one works the abdominals in a slightly different way. A few to add to your repertoire:

Pronated Leg Raises: Lie flat on your back, legs straight, hand tucked beneath your lower spine for support. Engage your abs and raise legs to about 45 degrees. Lower. Do 10 times.

V-Hold: Sit on floor, knees bent, hand tucked under your knees. Engage your core and slowly raise your feet off the floor several inches. Once you find your balance, extend your legs in front of you, creating a V-shape with your body. Hold 60 seconds.

Bicycle: This favorite of aerobic classes everywhere gets your heart rate up with working your obliques. Start on your back, knees bent, hands behind your head. Raise your head and feet off the floor and begin cycling your legs back and forth as it you re riding a bike. Bring opposite elbow to knee as you go. Do 60 seconds, rest 20 seconds, and go again.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY SPORTS

Why the NFL Red Zone is the best thing to ever happen to football

Around 2009, there was a huge cultural shift in the world of NFL football that changed the way many of us watch the games on Sunday. Sure, fantasy football gave us a reason to care about games and players that don’t affect our beloved team each week, but if you wanted to catch all the best action on a given day, you’d be hard-pressed.

Then, the NFL Network gave us the best gift yet.


As most NFL fans in the military already know, it’s going to be hard to watch your favorite team. If you didn’t buy into DirecTV’s Sunday Ticket and you still wanted to watch say, the Cincinnati Bengals, but you were stationed in Charleston, S.C., you probably had to go to a bar every Sunday — or just deal with whatever game they played on the local station.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

“If I have to sit around and watch the 2009 Bengals, I’m going to need a lot more of these beers…”

Unless you’re a Patriots fan, it’s highly unlikely that you’re going to be able to watch your favorite team every week. And even going to watch the games at a bar or restaurant gets costly week after week — after all, sitting there for three hours and not ordering anything is a trash move.

Chances are good there’s more than one football orphan in any given unit who has to wander around trying to catch a glimpse of his favorite team. For example, Chargers fans, Jaguars fans, and Bills fans don’t often get their teams on national airtime— or on Sunday, Monday, or Thursday Night Football.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

Unless they play You-Know-Who.

To please everyone week in and week out would be nearly impossible, not to mention all those poor bastards who have to work every Sunday — unlike the rest of us nonners — and don’t get to step away from the flightline or CQ desk.

Watching a football game featuring a team you hate or don’t care about can be excruciating. No one wants to watch Eli Manning struggle for another three hours every week but there he is, Manningface and all, because New York City has a lot of people in it and Arizona doesn’t have nearly as many.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

Not that I don’t enjoy how much Josh Rosen looks like the Cardinals logo.

And then there’s the fantasy football experience. Fantasy football has been around since 1962 but now, since people have computers that aren’t the size of entire buildings and they don’t have to do the math themselves, it has ballooned into an industry. Some 33 million people play fantasy football and many, many of them don’t have a team to root for.

They only care about the big plays and scoring drives. Now, that’s all they have to see. Everyone gets to catch the big moments every Sunday in the fall. By clipping between games to only show you the most important plays, Red Zone makes it all possible.

From the bottom of the hearts of all the short-attention-span-having, small-market-team-loving, don’t-want-to-buy-five-beers-every-Sunday fans out there: thank you, Red Zone.

Featured

From Annapolis to Miami: Navy midshipman drafted by the Dolphins

Last night, the Miami Dolphins drafted one of the most dynamic players to ever take the field for the United States Naval Academy. If you have seen Malcolm Perry play, it should be no surprise that he is being given a chance to play in the NFL.


From Annapolis to Miami! Malcolm Perry selected by the @MiamiDolphins. #NavyFB | #BuiltDifferentpic.twitter.com/pkrOIOUwD2

twitter.com

From Annapolis to Miami! Malcolm Perry selected by the Miami Dolphins!

The Navy quarterback is being drafted as a wide receiver as Dolphin scouts were deeply impressed with Perry’s athleticism which was on full display at the Senior Bowl and NFL Combine. Perry was only the second midshipman to be ever invited to the Combine and showed off his versatility as both a passer and receiver. Listed at 5’9″ and weighing 186 pounds, Perry ran a 4.63 in the 40-yard dash.

As Navy football fans probably know, Perry switched back and forth from quarterback and slot back while at the Naval Academy. The Dolphins hope that he will be able to develop into a route runner and be used in the slot. His senior year, he set numerous Naval Academy records as he led Navy’s triple option offense to an 11-2 record and another win over Army. Perry rushed for over 2,000 yards and scored 21 rushing touchdowns while also throwing for seven.

Malcolm Perry 2019 Navy Highlights

www.youtube.com

Malcolm Perry 2019 Navy Highlights

For those of you wondering about his service commitment, the rules are different than what they used to be. Defense Secretary Donald Esper announced in November 2019 that service academy cadets and midshipmen could either defer their military service or pay pack the cost of tuition if they were drafted in a professional sports draft.

Perry comes from a military family. Both his parents served in the 101st Airborne division and are Gulf War veterans. Perry grew up an Army brat and always thought about enlisting but never gave thought to going to a service academy, especially the one in Annapolis.

“Growing up, I thought being in the military was the coolest thing,” he said. “I just always figured I would enlist, though I didn’t know much about the academies themselves.” But Perry’s athleticism in high school bought him the attention of both the Navy and Air Force Academies and he ended up going Navy.

ESPN had cameras in Perry’s house (as with most notable draft prospects) because of the virtual nature of the 2020 NFL Draft due to the coronavirus outbreak. It is awesome they did because, we can see Perry and his family’s reaction to him being taken. Those Army parents look really nice in Navy gear, don’t they?

Here it is! Congrats #malcolmperry and family – and @MiamiDolphins!!pic.twitter.com/QzKRYssuUp

twitter.com

MIGHTY SPORTS

This decades-old exercise is still the best bodyweight workout

It’s usually a good rule of thumb for your workout of choice to not give you nostalgic vibes. Jazzersize, step aerobics, the Thighmaster — you might remember these fondly, but you shouldn’t try to bring them back. These fitness fads didn’t actually get people fit because they hit the same muscle groups over and over with an intensity that never varied. Here’s an exception to the rule: Calisthenics, those moves you did on your high school PE test, is worth reviving. Calisthenics offer virtually everything your body needs to grow muscle, boost cardio, and improve your flexibility. And you don’t need an instruction manual to do it.

In a nutshell, calisthenics involves rudimentary fitness activities like hopping, lunging, and stretching. These exercises focus on major muscle groups like biceps and quads, but because they are full-body movements, they also engage secondary muscles for stability and balance, giving you a well-rounded workout.


Calisthenics’ major selling point, its simplicity, can also be its biggest drawback: Too much repetition of the same easy move can be boring. That’s why we’ve put together a plan that lets you mix and match moves to create a whole host of different routines.

The build-your-own calisthenics workout

Choose one move from each category, with a goal of pairing together 4 exercises to create one full circuit, which you will perform three times through for a complete workout.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Angelica I. Annastas)

1. Calisthenic moves for arm strength

Pushups: Drop and give us 30. That’s right, 30.

Pullups: Grabbing the overhead bar with an underhand grip, hoist your body weight skyward until you clear the bar with your head. 10 reps.

Dips: Using a set of parallel bars, place a hand on either bar, palms facing in, and straighten arms until your feet are off the floor and your body is suspended in the air. Bend elbows and lower yourself down toward the floor without touching. Straight arms. Repeat 10 times.

Pulldowns: Lie with your chest directly beneath a bar or table edge. Reach up and grab the bar with an overhand grip, keeping your arms straight and body in a long straight line. Bend elbows and raise your chest toward the bar. Straighten arms back to start. 10 reps.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

2. Calisthenics moves for core strength

Situps: Start the stopwatch. Do as many of this classic gut-buster as you can in 60 seconds, aiming for 40.

Plank: From an extended pushups position, drop so that your elbows are resting on the floor beneath your shoulders. Maintaining one long, straight line from your feet to your head, hold this position for 60 seconds.

Hanging knee lifts: Using a set of parallel bars with elbow rests (wrap a towel around the bars if there is no padding), place a forearm on either bar and rest your weight on it. Lift your feet off the ground and bend your knees, raising them as high to your chest as you can before straightening legs. Do not let your feet touch the floor between reps. 10 reps.

L-shape lifts: Start by hanging from the pullup bar with your arms straight. Engage your core muscles as you lift your legs in unison in front of you, keeping them straight, until they are parallel (or as close as you can get them) to the floor. Release. 6-8 reps.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

3. Calisthenics moves for leg strength

Squats: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart. Bend elbows and tuck your hands to your chest as you bend your knees and squat down as if you are about to sit in a low chair. Stop when your thighs are parallel to the floor. Straight back up to the start. 12 reps.

Lunges: Stand with feet parallel, arms by your sides. Take a large step forward with your right leg, shifting your weight forward and landing with a bent right knee. Let your back left knee bend until it hovers above the floor. Push through your right foot and return to standing tall. Repeat on left side for one complete rep. 12 reps.

Leg raises: Lie with your back on the floor, legs extended. Place your hands by your sides or under the small of your back for support. Engaging your core, raise legs in unison off the floor and directly above your hips, keeping them straight. Lower back to floor. 8 reps.

Wall sit: Stand with your back to a wall. Pressing your back flat against the wall, bend your knees until your legs form a right angle and your thighs are parallel to the floor. (You will need to walk your feet forward about a foot so that your knees are directly over your toes in this position.) Hold for 90 seconds.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Corey Dabney)

4. Calisthenics moves for cardio

Jumping jacks: Feet apart and together, arms overhead each time. Aim for 40 in 60 seconds.

Jump rope: Single bounce, no stopping. 60 seconds.

Burpees: Start in an extended pushup position. Push through your toes, bend your knees, and hop your feet forward so they land close to your hands. Immediately spring up vertically off the floor, arms overhead. When you land, drop back down into a crouch with your hands on the floor, and jump your feet back to the starting pushup position. 20 reps.

Long jump/High jump: Stand with feet hip-width apart. Swing your arms behind you, bend your knees, and propel your body forward as far as you can in a two-leg long jump. Immediately, bend knees deeply and jump as high as you can vertically. Repeat long/high jump sequence 10 times.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY SPORTS

The NFL is learning how to fight as a unit from Special Forces vets

Veterans and military personnel are still understandably frustrated with NFL players kneeling during the national anthem — but that doesn’t mean the league is at odds with the military-veteran community. If the response from our community has taught anything to NFL franchises, it’s that teams have a lot to learn about how veterans and military units come together and operate as a team.


NFL players, for the most part, spend their whole lives training and preparing for the chance to play on Sundays in the fall. But throughout the course of their careers, they may end up playing for a slew of different teams with different objects, different methods, and different goals. No matter which city you’re representing, there’s a lot about football plays that can be related to small-unit tactics on the battlefield. The most important parts of both are to ensure each member of the team follows the plan, follows their orders, and covers their position. Your squad mates are depending on each man to do their part.

So, it makes sense to bring in some of the U.S. military’s finest veterans to show these players how individuals in military units come together to form a cohesive fighting force when the stakes are life and death. That’s where Mission6Zero comes in.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

Jason Van Camp served in the U.S. Army’s Special Forces.

(Mission6Zero)

“How can you fight for the guy next to you if you don’t even know who he is?”

Jason Van Camp is the Founder and Chairman of Mission6Zero. He’s also a former U.S. Army Special Forces soldier who graduated from West Point and played football for the Army’s Black Knights. He founded Mission6Zero to help teams in professional sports, the corporate world, and law enforcement optimize their performance through knowledge — knowledge of themselves, their organization, and their surroundings.

While Mission6Zero isn’t limited to the NFL, the NFL needs Mission6Zero now more than ever — and the Army football player is uniquely situated to address their issues. He put together his own expert team, one that included fellow SF veteran and Seattle Seahawks longsnapper, Nate Boyer.

“When things get really bad, the warfighter is thinking only of his team.”

Van Camp’s organization brings Special Forces veterans, Medal of Honor recipients, wounded warriors, drill instructors, and other exceptional veterans (along with human performance psychologists and behavioral experts) to the fore when dealing with athletic franchises. In their most recent case study, they found it wasn’t just what team members communicated to one another that was important, it was how they communicated that mattered.

Mission6Zero does more than tell war stories and lecture teams on how to be more like a unit. The science behind how members of a unit bond in combat is the same as how members bond on a team. The more you learn about someone, the closer you get to that person. When you start to know everyone on that level, the team becomes the most important part of life.

You will never want to let the team down, but, just as importantly, you know they will never let you down.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

Green Beret and Seattle Seahawks player Nate Boyer.

(Mission6Zero)

“The warfighter’s biggest fear is to let down the teammate to his left or right. “

It may seem obvious to a military veteran, but to many athletes and professional sports teams, it’s not so obvious. Through the course of Mission6Zero’s work in the NFL, the organization found instances of teammates who had never spoken to one another – even after the season began.

When Mission6Zero finds that the best predictor of team productivity is how teams communicate outside of the workplace and there are teammates who never talk at all, it’s easy to identify potential problems in an organization. Those “Mandatory Fun” sessions we weren’t so keen on attending while we were in the military were actually one of the most useful training opportunities we could ever have attended.

That’s the science of teambuilding.

MIGHTY SPORTS

Auburn superstar is expected to be a Top 10 NFL Draft pick. He’s also an Army brat.

While the NFL Draft this year might look a little different courtesy of the pandemic, the level of talent, anticipation and excitement we’ve come to expect remains the same, even if it will be done from the basement of current NFL commissioner, Roger Goodell. (But first, let’s raise a quick toast to this moment of gratitude we’re all experiencing just from having something sports-related to talk about again). And in this year’s NFL Virtual Draft, there’s no one we’re more excited to watch than Army brat Derrick Brown.


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Sure, this is the first (and hopefully only) time the NFL is hosting a virtual draft but we’ve played in enough fantasy football leagues to know that at the end of the day, it doesn’t really matter where you pick your team from (in this case it might be in a coach’s family room or kitchen). It’s all about who ends up on your roster before that first kick off.

There is so much talent in this year’s pool. Of course you’ve got Heisman Trophy winner and LSU standout Joe Burrow, who passed for over 5,600 yards with 60 touchdowns – the most TDs in a single season in NCAA history. No one will be a bit surprised if he goes first to the Bengals — really, the bigger shock would be if he wasn’t the number one pick. Ohio State juniors Chase Young and Jeff Okudah are two of the best defensive prospects this year. In fact, you’ve got a lot of great juniors this year: Tua Tagovailoa out of Alabama, Clemson’s Isaiah Simmons, Tristan Wirfs from Iowa. All excellent picks.

All things considered — talent, integrity, character and commitment — Auburn’s Derrick Brown is our top pick to watch. At 6’5″ and 317 pounds, he looks like a Marvel superhero, and on the field he definitely acts like one. His football credentials stand on their own: U.S. Army All-American Bowl Defensive Player of the Year. Georgia Sports Writers Association Player of the Year as a high school senior with 106 tackles, 42 for loss, and 12 sacks at Lanier High. Played in all 13 games as a true freshman (11 tackles, 1.5 for loss) and then became a full-time starter for the Tigers in 2017 (56 tackles, nine tackles for loss, 3.5 sacks, two forced fumbles in 14 games). SEC coaches voted him second-team all-conference in 2018, when he started all 13 games, compiling 48 tackles, 10.5 tackles for loss, 4.5 sacks and two pass breakups from the middle of Auburn’s defense. First-team Associated Press All-American, first-team All-SEC honors and finalist for the Chuck Bednarik Award and Outland Trophy after posting 55 tackles, tying for the team lead with 12.5 tackles for loss, collecting four sacks and four pass breakups and causing two fumbles.

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Brown with the SEC’s Student Leadership Council.

Derrick Brown – Twitter

Simply put: Brown is a beast.

But there’s so much more to him than just football. Brown is also a servant leader, being selected to the SEC’s Student Leadership Council in 2017. Most impressively, Brown won the 2019 Lott IMPACT Trophy, which goes to the defensive player who has the biggest IMPACT (Integrity, Maturity, Performance, Academics, Community and Tenacity).

Sure, Brown honed those skills on the field, but it started at home. Brown’s father served in the Army as a paratrooper before becoming a Law Enforcement Officer.

See the impact his father’s service had on him here in a video produced by USAA:

Log in on Vimeo

vimeo.com

Good luck, Derrick! Military families everywhere are cheering for you.

MIGHTY MILSPOUSE

Army, Navy football returns to the field

After months filled with as much uncertainty as tomorrow, Army and Navy are about to begin their respective football schedules.

Air Force will have to wait.

Army is set to kick off against Middle Tennessee State at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 5, at West Point, New York. Navy is expected to open its season when it hosts BYU at 8 p.m. on Sept. 7 on ESPN in Annapolis, Maryland.


The coronavirus pandemic has forced college football programs to be flexible in myriad ways, none more so than with their schedules. Some conferences and teams will forgo playing this fall, with hopes of returning in the spring, while other schools lost appealing non-conference matchups.

Then there is Air Force, whose schedule consists of two games: Oct. 3 against Navy in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and Nov. 7 at Army. Air Force belongs to the Mountain West Conference, which postponed fall sports in August.

“We were allowed to look at the possibility to play Army and Navy since we all have similar 47-month physical requirements for graduation, have similar testing protocols and have a cadet population that is secured from the public,” Air Force athletic spokesman Troy Garnhart said in an email.

The Falcons are not looking to add other games, Garnhart said.

Regardless of the pandemic, the service academies have said they plan to play each other this year.

Army and Navy are scheduled to meet for the 121st time on Dec. 12 in Philadelphia. They first met in 1890, when Benjamin Harrison was president, and have played every year since 1930.

Army is scheduled to host eight games at Michie Stadium in 2020, but the Black Knights lost a marquee home matchup against Oklahoma when its conference, the Big 12, canceled non-league road games. The Sooners were scheduled to visit West Point on Sept. 26.

Attendance at Army’s first two home games, the opener against Middle Tennessee State and Sept. 12 against Louisiana-Monroe, will be limited to the corps of approximately 4,400 cadets, athletic spokeswoman Rachel Caton said.

“Attendance at games is typically mandatory for the corps, so all should be expected to be in attendance,” Caton said in an email. “They will just be sitting in a different area of the stadium than usual and will be socially distanced.”

Decisions about fans for the Black Knights’ other home games have not been determined, Caton said.

Unlike Army’s on-campus stadium, Navy does not play its home games on federal land. Because Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium is off campus, the Midshipmen are subject to regulations imposed by the Maryland Department of Health, which banned fans from outdoor sports events in June, Navy spokesman Scott Strasemeier said in an email.

“We are still optimistic there will be home football games this season where our season-ticket holders will be extended the opportunity to personally attend,” Navy athletic director Chet Gladchuk said in a statement. “Improving conditions may dictate justification to open our gates in a setting with extensive safety protocols being appropriately administered.”

Whether fans will be allowed at Air Force’s home game against Navy is not expected to be decided until mid-September, Garnhart said.

While Navy intends to play a full American Athletic Conference schedule and didn’t lose its games against Army or Air Force, the Midshipmen won’t face Notre Dame because of the pandemic. Navy originally was scheduled to open the season with that matchup in Dublin, Ireland, then it was moved to Annapolis before being canceled.

Navy and Notre Dame had met in football every year since 1927.

Navy and Air Force finished 11-2 in 2019. Army, whose football program does not belong to a conference, went 5-8 last season.

FOOTBALL SCHEDULES

AIR FORCE

Oct. 3 vs. Navy

Nov. 7 at Army, 1:30 p.m.

ARMY

Sept. 5 vs. Middle Tennessee State, 1:30 p.m. (CBS Sports Network)

Sept. 12 vs. Louisiana-Monroe, 1:30 p.m. (CBS Sports Network)

Sept. 19 vs. BYU, 3:30 p.m. (CBS)

Sept. 26 at Cincinnati

Oct. 3 vs. Abilene Christian, 1:30 p.m. (CBS Sports Network)

Oct. 10 vs. The Citadel, 1:30 p.m. (CBS Sports Network)

Oct. 17 at UTSA, 1:30 p.m. (CBS Sports Network)

Oct. 24 vs. Mercer, 1:30 p.m. (CBS Sports Network)

Nov. 7 vs. Air Force, 1:30 p.m. (CBS)

Nov. 14 at Tulane

Nov. 21 vs. Georgia Southern, 1:30 p.m. (CBS Sports Network)

Dec. 12 vs. Navy in Philadelphia, 3 p.m. (CBS)

NAVY

Sept. 7 vs. BYU, 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Sept. 19 at Tulane, noon (ABC)

Sept. 26 vs. Temple (CBS Sports Network)

Oct. 3 at Air Force

Oct. 17 at East Carolina

Oct. 24 vs. Houston (CBS Sports Network)

Oct. 31 at SMU

Nov. 7 vs. Tulsa (CBS Sports Network)

Nov. 14 vs. Memphis (ESPN family of networks)

Nov. 21 at South Florida

Dec. 5 AAC championship game

Dec. 12 vs. Army in Philadelphia, 3 p.m. (CBS)

Note: TV and time information have not been determined unless listed. Game times are subject to change.

This article originally appeared on Military Families Magazine. Follow @MilFamiliesMag on Twitter.

MIGHTY SPORTS

Watch this dedicated 49er shake every military hand before MNF

While some people see the NFL’s Salute to Service as a PR stunt, paid for by the U.S. military (we know who you are; we read the comments), what you need to know is that no matter who’s paying for it, those players really mean it. It’s the individual that really takes on the mantle of showing affection for U.S. troops.

To see appreciation in action, look no further than the 49ers’ George Kittle.


The 49ers’ tight end was the top passing target for San Francisco during the Veterans Day game on Monday night. The former Iowa Hawkeye had nine receptions for 83 yard in the 49ers’ loss to the Giants, but it was the reception he gave before the game that has fans talking.

The Nov. 12th game was played on the evening the United States observed Veterans Day and, as a result, was attended by dozens of uniformed servicemen and women from every branch of the U.S. Armed Forces. The 49ers invited the troops to open the game.

At the end of the National Anthem and before the game’s kickoff, Kittle made his way to the sidelines to shake each of the visiting troops’ hands. The video of Kittle shaking hands went viral, but not because Kittle had a camera following him – there was no time for a photo op. That’s just the kind of guy he is.

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Kittle and the 49ers led for much of Monday night’s game, outdone only in the last few minutes of the game, losing to the Eli Manning-led Giants 27-23.

“He’s got a good personality,” says 49ers head coach Kyle Shanahan. “He acts like a WWE wrestler and I don’t think that’s an act; I think that’s who he is 24/7, which is fun to watch. But you’ve always got to watch out for him. He’s pretty rowdy all the time.”

Fellow players and staff describe Kittle as a “mild-mannered and respectful citizen” off the field. On the field, however, they call him a “scarlet-and-gold-clad superhero,” according to Bleacher Report.

This is not the 49ers’ first run-in with veterans this season. The team was one of a handful of teams who trained in the offseason with U.S. special operations veterans. San Francisco’s players, coaches, and scouts trained with a cadre of Navy SEAL veterans.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

During the first phase of the offseason program, 49ers players, coaches and members of the scouting staff participated in a rigorous (albeit familiar-looking) workout led by veteran Navy SEALs.

(49ers.com)

MIGHTY SPORTS

How to prepare for the ‘Murph’ fitness challenge

The Memorial Day Murph, a workout created in honor of Michael Murphy, a Navy SEAL awarded the Medal of Honor for Operation Redwings in Afghanistan 2005 requires an intermediate to advanced level of fitness to complete.

The challenge is popular with many tactical athletes, CrossFit, and other exercise groups and can be found at The Murph Challenge.

Here is a way to help prepare for the high repetitions of pullups (100), pushups (200), and squats (300). Over the next several weeks, progress throughout the pyramid below a few days a week and see if you score better each week, by moving up the pyramid. See below:


Warmup

You should warm up well with this workout, in fact, the warmup/run pyramid works well to not only prepare you for higher rep sets but will help you slowly accumulate repetitions for the grand 100,200,300 grand totals.

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U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Derek Seifert, 633rd Air Base Wing photojournalist, performs a pull-up during a Memorial Day Murph and Pararescue Workout event

(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Areca T. Bell)

Pushups / Squat Pyramid: Run 100m, 1 pushup/squats, Run 100m – 2 pushup/squats run 100m – 3/3…up to 10/10. This warmup will yield 55 squats and 55 pushups to add to the Murph Workout (100 pullups, 200 pushups, 300 squats) below:

This Half Pyramid has you starting at 1 and building up to level 10 in ten sets.

PT HALF Pyramid 1-10 (*1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10)

  • pullups x 1 (55 reps)
  • Pushups x 2 (110 reps) (*2,4,6,8,10,12,14,16,18,20)
  • Squats x 3 (165 reps) (*3,6,9,12,15,18,21,24,27,30)
  • Run 400m

For clarity, the sets of the PT Pyramid breaks down like this:

  • Set 1: Pullup 1, Pushups 2, Squats 3, run 400m
  • Set 2: Pull-ups 2, Pushups 4, Squats 6, run 400m
  • Set 3: Pull-ups 3, Pushups 6, Squats 9, run 400m…Keep going up the pyramid until you fail, then resort in reverse order after failing at two exercises.

Reverse PT Pyramid with Pull-ups and Squats with cardio of choice each set to recover from each set

9-1. (*9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1)

  • Pull-ups x 1 – total for day equals 100 pull-ups
  • Squats x 3 – total for day equals 300 squats
Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Jared Martin, 633rd Security Forces Squadron police services NCO in charge, performs a push-up during a Memorial Day Murph and Pararescue Workout event.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Areca T. Bell)

For more information on the PT Pyramid, see the full article, The PT Pyramid is what I call a Foundation Workout. It helps the user build a solid foundation of calisthenics and increases volume so you will improve your previous limits. Once you get to level 10 and back down to 1 again you will have done 100 pullups, 200 pushups, and 300 squats. You do this each set by doubling each pull-up set for pushups, and tripling each pull-up set for squats.

You have 35 pushups to complete the FULL Murph 100,200,300 rep challenge and at the same time, work on your goal pace running intervals for future timed run events.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

U.S. service members and their families participate in a 1-mile run during the Memorial Day Murph and Pararecue Workout event.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Areca T. Bell)

YES, this is 10 sets of 1/4 mile runs at goal mile pace for timed runs. Arrange as needed (use a treadmill or track if pull-up bar nearby)

Finish the workout with a Mini Mobility Cooldown that has some form of non-impact/walking, stretching, and foam rolling of muscles that will be sore – thighs, hamstrings, chest, upper back/lats, and arms.

Repeat 2 times

  • Non-Impact cardio 5 min
  • Foam roll / Stretch 5 min

Good luck with preparing for this journey and a worthy reminder of our fallen heroes.

This article originally appeared on Military.com. Follow @militarydotcom on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

An NFL player and West Pointer reenlisted troops before the Cardinals-Rams game

In the hours before the Arizona Cardinals kicked off against the Los Angeles Rams, an even more special thing happened in the Cardinals’ end zone. Unfortunately for the Cardinals, it was only one of two events that took place in their end zone all night. Arizona fell to Los Angeles 31-9, but 45 U.S. troops were sworn in or reenlisted that night.


You win some, you lose some.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga
West Point NFL player conducts mass oath of enlistment ceremony

But wait a minute. According to 10 U.S. Code § 502, the oath has to be administered by a commissioned officer. So who is swearing in these kids and troops? That’s 1st Lt. Brett Toth, who is a beneficiary of the recent rule changes to service academy athletes. Toth’s military service requirement was deferred in order to play offensive tackle for the Arizona Cardinals while he was in prime physical condition. Toth is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and a former player for the Army Black Knights football team. He played in two of Army’s most recent wins over Navy.

The group of 45 future soldiers and Marines gathered in front of him before the game’s kickoff were recruits from the Phoenix Recruiting Battalion and was part of the local Salute to Service celebration within the Cardinals franchise. The Cardinals, former home of a deceased Army ranger and former Cardinal Pat Tillman, are very excited to celebrate Salute to Service every November. It doesn’t hurt to have an actual lieutenant on hand, either.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

(U.S. Army photo by Alun Thomas)

As Toth, who is currently on the team’s disabled list, led the mass Oath of Enlistment, the crowd began to cheer wildly. After taking the oath, the 45 newly-christened U.S. troops were able to stay for the game. When the Cardinals took the field, the first people out of the locker room were Capt. Edward Donaghue, commander of the Phoenix Recruiting Battalion, and Staff Sgt. Gregory Hunter, one of the battalion’s recruiters.

Though the game started on a very high note for the Cardinals players and for America’s newest troops, it didn’t take long to turn for the worst. The Cardinals were soundly defeated in a 31-9 loss to the Rams.

MIGHTY SPORTS

The best and worst cities to be a football fan may not surprise you

Another football season is nearing its end and the excitement surrounding this season, the surprise Clemson win, the NFC Championship controversy, and the upcoming Super Bowl inspired the people over at WalletHub to do yet another study on the habits and happiness of your average Americans – this time, with a focus on the gridiron.


Keep in mind, this isn’t just about NFL football, but you will find familiar NFL franchise cities on the top of the list. It also includes NCAA football. Some 244 American cities were graded on 21 different metrics using a 100-point scale, with 100 being a perfectly favorable score. WalletHub included one professional team or one college team, and assigned weights to each category based on its popularity with fans. The weighted averages comprise the list and are grouped by city size.

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“Terrible.”

The top ten will likely not be a surprise to anyone. Pittsburgh, home of die-hard Steelers fans and the Panthers of the NCAA’s Atlantic Coast Conference, tops the list. That’s followed by the homes of the New England Patriots, Green Bay Packers, Dallas Cowboys, Giants, Dolphins, Saints, and so on. The first time the home of a nationally-ranked college football team comes is at the end of the 30 cities where NFL franchises are housed.

At the top of the college football list of best cities for football fans sits another unsurprising winner.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

Roll Tide.

Clemson, S.C., may have defeated the Crimson Tide for the BCS National Championship, but they’re in second place when it comes to fandom. As you scroll the list you’ll find the homes of the Florida State Seminoles, the LSU Tigers, and the Penn State Nittany Lions. What might surprise you is the high ranking for the North Dakota State Bison, Appalachian State Mountaineers, and the U.S. Military Academy’s Black Knights.

In case you were wondering, West Point, N.Y. sits at number 39 while Annapolis, Md. is all the way at number 123, sandwiched between the home of the Cal Poly Mustangs and the Eastern Michigan University Eagles. Colorado Springs, the home of the U.S. Air Force Academy, is number 115.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga

There’s always next year, Navy.

As for the bottom of the list, the lowest ranked NFL city is Cleveland, which is unsurprising considering they once dubbed the Browns’ FirstEnergy Stadium the “Factory of Sadness.” In terms of the NCAA, the biggest surprise at the bottom of the college football list is the low, low ranking for the homes of the Oregon State Beavers and the Purdue Boilermakers, who scrape the bottom of a list of 244.

Check out the full list in the WalletHub Infographic.

Why this Army vet ditched pills for cannabis and yoga
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