History

That time 'Fighting Dick' fought 'Fightin' Dick' at Antietam

High-ranking officers often have monikers that accompany them for their military prowess in battle or how they conduct themselves. General "Mad Dog" Mattis was given his by the press after his "be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet" speech. Colonel "Mad Jack" Churchill got his when the British Expeditionary Force moved in on France and he became the only Brit to score a long bow kill in WWII.


Rarely will a moniker be used for more than one military leader, especially within the same time or military. Even more rare is when they two meet on opposite ends of the battlefield. This is exactly what happened when Maj. Gen. "Fighting Dick" Richardson fought Maj. Gen. "Fightin' Dick" Anderson for the "Bloody Lane" at Antietam during the Civil War.

Bloody Lane was smack-dab in the middle of the battle. (Image via Wikicommons)

Israel B. Richardson was a United States Army officer who fought in the Mexican-American War and eventually promoted to Major General while serving in the Union Army during the Civil War. He was nicknamed "Fighting Dick" after his last name. He lead the 1st Division of the II Corps into the Battle of Antietam.

And in the other corner, Richard H. Anderson was a United States Army officer who fought in the Mexican-American War and was eventually promoted to Major General while serving in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. He was nicknamed "Fightin' Dick" after his first name. He lead the appropriately named "Anderson's Division," who were tasked with defending the Sunken Road.

The Sunken Road would later be known as Bloody Lane after the fighting ended. (Image via History)

On Sept. 17, 1862, 87,000 Union troops met the 38,000 Confederates near Sharpsburg, Maryland. Richardson's men charged the road to pierce through the Confederate defenses. For nearly four hours, both sides fought until Union troops finally took the hill. However, Union troops were not able to hold the new ground and were forced back. The battle was declared tactically inconclusive but was a strategic victory for Richardson.

Both "Fighting Dicks" were critically wounded in battle; Anderson was wounded in the thigh and Richardson was struck by a shell fragment. Anderson would recover and continue on fighting into Gettysburg and Appomattox, but Richardson's wound became infected and he passed of pneumonia nearly a month later.