The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6 - We Are The Mighty
Tactical

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6

The Navy just released information to the fleet on the fielding of its new Navy Working Uniform Type III, the pixelated green, black and brown camouflage duds that look an awful lot like the Marine Corps’ MARPAT digital cammies.


This is the second camouflage uniform for the Navy in less than 10 years, and replaces the oft-mocked blue, black and grey “blueberries” deployed to the force in 2008 to the tune of $224 million.

The new Navy Type IIIs look pretty badass and come with all the whistles and bells of previous combat-style uniforms, including shoulder pockets, velcro tabs for all your merit badges and flags and a collar designed to protect against body armor chafing. The camo pattern is a lighter green version of the Marine Corps forest MARPAT and, if you look closely, the have the Navy Anchor, Constitution and Eagle, or “ACE,” embedded in the pattern.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Notice the Anchor, Constitution and Eagle logo embedded in the pattern. (Photo from Wikimedia Commons)

There’s also a desert digital version that’ll be only for sailors operating in arid climes abroad. The new Navy Working Uniform Type III is set to be rolled out Navy wide Oct. 1 and will typically be worn by sailors at home stations.

While the new green digital Type IIIs look a darn sight better than the Type I “blueberries,” they trace their lineage to some of America’s most elite warriors. Now all sailors can have a little of the “operator” spring in their step thanks to their brother frogmen.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Medal of Honor Senior Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Edward C. Byers Jr. wearing AOR1 combat duds during a deployment to Afghanistan. (U.S. Navy Photo)

In the mid-2000s, as special operations forces were fighting pitched battles against al Qaeda terrorists worldwide, Naval Special Warfare operators were refining their kit to better suit the environments they were fighting in. About the time Army Special Forces and Rangers cast their gaze at Crye Precision’s MultiCam pattern, sailors in SEAL Team 6 were testing out a modified version of the Corps’ MARPAT.

What came out of the battlefield research were two patterns dubbed AOR1 and AOR2. AOR1 was a slightly darker version of the Corps’ desert digital pattern but ran more vertically than horizontal, and AOR2 was a brighter green-hued woodland MARPAT, perfect for SEAL operations in places like the Philippines where they were hunting al Qaeda affiliates.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Navy SEALs assigned to a west coast based SEAL Team debark a hostile vessel off the coast of San Diego. Naval Special Warfare Boat Team (SBT) 12 assisted in the operation by providing small boat insertion and extraction to and from the boarded vessel. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kristopher Kirsop/Released)

The uniform was the exclusive province of Naval Special Warfare operators for several years, who wore tactical duds in those patterns manufactured by outside vendors like Beyond Clothing. They didn’t become standard Navy issue until 2010, when the service opted to field the AOR2-patterned uniforms to “expeditionary” sailors — typically Seabees, EOD technicians, riverine troops and others who operate closely with ground-based forces overseas.

Interestingly, at the time the Navy precluded sailors other than SEALs from wearing the desert AOR1 pattern, opting instead to keep sailors in the desert wearing the old tri-color analog pattern.

Fast forward to 2016 and the service announced it would field the DevGru-approved AOR2/Type III green-camo uniforms across the force, casting the cartoonish blue Type I patterned uniforms to the dustbin of history.

Guess now there’s another reason to buy that SEAL a drink.

MIGHTY TRENDING

The designer of the most popular rifle in the world just got his own statue in Moscow

With a sprinkle of holy water and a protester condemning the late Mikhail Kalashnikov as a “manufacturer of death,” Russian authorities have unveiled a monument to the designer of the widely used AK-47 assault rifle.


Culture Minister Vladimir Medinsky and the head of state-run military-industrial conglomerate Rostec were on hand for the dedication of the monument to Kalashnikov on the Garden Ring road in central Moscow on September 19.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
AK-47 | Public Domain photo

The statue — not far from monuments to renowned poets Vladimir Mayakovsky and Aleksandr Pushkin — was unveiled by Kalashnikov’s daughter, Yelena Kalashnikova.

Minutes before the ceremony began, a man unfurled a sign saying, “the manufacturer of weapons is a manufacturer of death.” He was quickly detained by police and taken away from the site.

The weapon Kalashnikov invented is the most widely used assault rifle in the world and has been fired in nearly every conflict around the globe for the last 50 years.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Hungarian rebels carrying captured AK-47s. Public domain photo.

There are estimated to be as many as 200 million Kalashnikov rifles around the world.

“Mikhail Kalashnikov is an embodiment of the best features of a Russian person — extraordinary natural giftedness, simplicity, honesty, organizational talent,” Medinsky said, adding that “the Kalashnikov assault rifle is truly…a cultural brand of Russia.”

The head of Russia’s Udmurtia region, Aleksandr Brechalov, spoke at the ceremony, praising Kalashnikov for his contribution to “Russia’s glory and defense.”

Kalashnikov lived and worked for many years in the capital of Udmurtia, Izhevsk, where Kalashnikov assault rifles are still made.

A Russian Orthodox priest then prayed for Kalashnikov and sprinkled the monument with water sanctified by the church.

But Kalashnikov — who was born into a peasant family during the civil war that followed the Bolshevik Revolution and died in 2013 at the age of 94 — voiced mixed feelings about his achievements and his legacy late in life.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
US Marines test firing AK-47 rifles. The AK-47 is the most popular assault rifle in the world. (Photo US Marine Corps)

Several months before his death, he wrote a letter to the head of the Russian Orthodox Church in which he said: “The pain in my soul is unbearable.

“I keep asking myself the same unsolvable question: If my assault rifle took people’s lives that means that I…am responsible for people’s deaths.”

Medinsky presented plans to Putin for the Kalashnikov statue in September 2016 during a tour of the Kalashnikov Group’s headquarters in Izhevsk.

The project was backed by the Russian Military-Historical Society — which is chaired by Medinsky — and by Rostec, whose CEO is Putin ally Sergei Chemezov. Rostec is the majority owner of Kalashnikov.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Photo by Sgt. Pete Thibodeau/U.S. Marine Corps

The monument was unveiled on a state-mandated professional holiday honoring Russian arms makers going back to tsarist times.

Kremlin critics say that Putin, who has involved Russia in wars in Syria and Ukraine and touts Soviet and imperial-era battlefield achievements to promote patriotism, focuses on military affairs to draw attention away from domestic troubles.

Tactical

The world’s special forces train at this base in Jordan

Located on the outskirts of the capital city of Amman, the sound of gunfire, explosions, helicopters, and tire screeches reverberate around the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Centre.


A massive 6,000 acre compound, KASOTC is dedicated to the training of special forces operators from around the world. It has everything it needs to train operators — a mock village, an embassy compound, driving and shooting ranges, and even an Airbus A300 with targets to simulate hostage scenarios.

“Simply put, if special operations units are the tip of the spear, then KASOTC is the sharpening-tool that hones it,” the center’s website states. It certainly lives up to its motto: “Where Advanced Training Meets Advanced Technology.”

Also read: This is the ‘Super Bowl’ for special ops commandos

KASOTC is the project of Jordan’s King Abdullah II, a graduate of Britain’s Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and the former commander of Jordan’s Special Forces. The king recognized the importance of special operations and counter-terrorism in the 21st Century, particularly in the Middle East, and wanted Jordan to be a leader in these types of warfare.

Built by a US company on land donated by King Abdullah, KASOTC is handled by the Jordanian armed forces and private security companies.

They have trained military teams, private security contractors, and even the actors playing SEALs from Zero Dark Thirty. They also hold the Annual Warrior Competition, a contest where the best special forces teams from around the world participate in exercises and drills.

Take a look at KASOTC here:

The King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Centre opened in 2009 and trains special forces teams from various nations, as well as private contractors and security firms.

The main part of KASOTC is a massive amount of buildings designed for counter-terror and urban warfare.

The buildings include residential areas, an embassy compound, industrial facilities, government buildings, and public areas.

They’ve been built to be as realistic as possible. Some have features like exploding charges, fires, and sound systems that play everything from gunfire to the screams of civilians.

KASOTC also has a Airbus A300 and control tower.

Related: Jordan’s new Black Hawks will punish terror cells on its border

The plane features targets and civilian dummies that can move up and down, and speakers that play the sound of panicked civilians.

The Jordanian Armed Forces, particularly its Special Operations Forces, train regularly at KASOTC.

The drills conducted at KASOTC include helicopter insertions, hostage rescue, and urban warfare.

KASOTC offers courses to teach soldiers how to use vehicles in special operations.

Dirt bikes are also common at KASOTC. KASOTC has hosted international military exercises like Eager Lion. Its facilities and equipment make it one of the best places to hold these exercises.

More: Watch Jordan’s King Abdullah II lead his troops in a live-fire exercise

Jordan’s king and KASOTC’s namesake, King Abdullah II, makes frequent visits to the training center, as does his son Crown Prince Al-Hussein bin Abdullah II

King Abdullah, sometimes referred to as the “Warrior King” for his military background, is known to participate in drills himself.

As does the crown prince.

KASOTC also hosts the Annual Warrior Competition, where special forces teams and elite police units from around the world compete to be recognized as the best.

While a regular week of training can cost as much as $200,000 the competition is free to whoever can make it. The teams compete by running various drills like hostage rescue, urban battles, VIP protection, and marksman competitions. Obstacle courses are timed to find out which team is fastest. Speed is a very important part of the competition. The teams learn valuable lessons that help them on the battlefield, like Iraqi soldiers who fight against ISIS.

MIGHTY GAMING

7 tips to make your life easy in open-world shooters

Shooting games are loved across the military, whether it’s Battlefield, Call of Duty, or any other video game that breaks up the monotony of the hurry-up-and-wait lifestyle.

Open-world shooters make for some of the best games available on the market today. They give you full freedom to choose when and how you go about accomplishing each mission, offering fast-paced, frenetic gameplay without the linear monotony of yesterday’s titles. But along with this freedom of choice comes a hefty dose of challenge that’ll give any player a run for their money.

While most troops have the skills and knowledge they need to survive the digital battlefield just long enough to not feel compelled to throw a controller through the T.V., we’ve got some general tips to take you to the next level.


The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6

In the absence of cover, go prone and use concealment.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Trevor Rowett)

Stick to cover

If your goal is to stay alive (which it probably is), then cover is your best friend. And just to be clear: bushes are not cover, they’re concealment. Cover is solid and should be able to take a beating from incoming bullets.

Just remember, if you can see the enemy, they can see you. Your goal is always to make yourself the smallest target you can.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6

Only run when you absolutely must.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Antonia E. Mercado)

Don’t rush

Slow is smooth and smooth is fast. So, take your time. If you must cover a large area, sprint between pieces of cover, not in a straight line toward your objective. Plus, in most games, sprinting across an open area will cause your character to run out of stamina — making you a slow, exposed target.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6

This method counters the recoil and increases your overall accuracy.

(U.S Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Patrick Osino)

Fire in controlled bursts

Automatic weapons are great but the recoil degrades your accuracy more the longer you hold the trigger down. This is one thing that video games get right — though it’s often exaggerated. The way to solve this issue in a video game is the same as it is in real life: fire 5-to-6-round bursts.

If you aren’t used to it, simply repeat the phrase, “run, fuzzy bunny, run” in your head. That’ll take about 6 rounds to say.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6

These bad boys are your worst enemy on the battlefield in Battlefield.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Austin Livingston/Released)

Vehicles are priority targets

If you’ve played any iteration of Battlefield, then you know how irritating it is when other players only focus on enemy infantry and not the tanks or helicopters. This ought to be common sense, but let’s talk about it anyway: vehicles take priority over infantry.

They are your biggest enemies on the battlefield and they’ll inflict the largest amount of casualties. So, always go for helicopters, tanks, or any other vehicle that has a big gun attached to it.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6

Indirect fire is your best friend.

(U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Pfc. Heather Atherton)

High-explosives win the day

Military commanders will preach this all day, and rightfully so. Explosives are your greatest asset on the battlefield and you ought to utilize them as much as possible. They allow you to eliminate large groups of enemies with minimal effort and destroy vehicles quickly, allowing infantry to work on individual targets.

That being said, don’t waste your grenades on one person. This might work in Halo or Call of Duty, where multiplayer matches are more like a series of duels, but in open-world shooters, you’ll want to wait until you’re fighting a large group dumb enough to cluster together.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6

Your muzzle goes where your eyes go.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Austyn Saylor)

Aim with your eyes

It’s easy to look to different parts of the screen while playing a game to acquire targets but, just as you would in real life, move your weapon with your eyes so, when you find a target, you can engage immediately.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6

Don’t do this.

(U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Pfc. Heather Atherton)

Avoid making a silhouette

If you need to look through a window, stick to the edges to avoid being seen by enemies outside.

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Watch these Marines survive the famous helo dunker blindfolded

Marines train the way they fight, even if that means potentially suffering injuries in the process. Since many Marine units are known for their amphibious capabilities, they must conduct training that prepares them for any watery hazards that might come their way.

One such deadly situation that Marines must ready for is a helicopter crash landing into the ocean. Although it’s unlikely, Marines must be ready to escape a watery grave by successfully evacuating a flooding aircraft within a matter of moments.


As you might expect, Marines practice their escape by facing the real hazard in a controlled environment. After jumping into a pool while wearing most of their combat load, Marines swim their way onto a mock helicopter that’s already halfway submerged in water.

Once they’ve strapped into their seats, they are blindfolded with fogged-out goggles for added stress. The helo dunker is then hoisted up into the air.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Inside the help dunker, just seconds before the training commences.
(Daily Aviation Archive)

Once the instructors give the order, the helo dunker is lowered into the water and spun about to disorient the blindfolded Marines within. Each Marine is instructed to take one last breath as they feel the aircraft hit the water’s surface and plunge beneath.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Training begins as the dunker rapidly fills with water and turns its side.
(Daily Aviation Archive)

The windows in various transport and cargo helicopters are designed to be removed in a hurry. Once a Marine successfully negotiates the closed-window obstacle, they are free to evacuate the dunker and swim to the surface for some much-needed oxygen.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Once fully submerged and upside down, the Marines begin their quick escape.
(Daily Aviation Archive)

The helo dunker isn’t the only tool used in training for an underwater escape. Marines also train in single-man cages. Instructors roll Marines about and observe as disoriented troops attempt to free themselves from the helicopter’s seat belt system.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Single-man escape cages.
(Daily Aviation Archive)

This is a required training for Marine Expeditionary Units set to deploy.

Watch the Daily Aviation Archive‘s video below to see Marines successfully negotiate this intense underwater training — blindfolded.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hr2B_Gay2f0

popular

How to start a fire with only one hand

Heading out into the wilderness for a camping trip is exhilarating and refreshing. Starting a campfire and roasting some marshmallows under the stars is a great way to get in touch with Mother Nature. Although the idea of spending a night in the great outdoors sounds incredible, campers should always remember to bring specific tools and learn important survival skills in the event they sustain an injury and help is far, far away.

It gets cold out there at night, so it’s important to know the basics of starting a fire to keep warm — even in the dire circumstance that you’ve been injured. Do you know how to start a fire with just one hand? You never know — this skill might just save your life.


The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
It’s difficult to start a fire if your arm is in a splint…

With your arm in a sling, place narrow log on the ground and then angle a knife up against it. Now, under the knife’s blade, place some dry kindling. Since you only have one-hand, squarely set your foot on the knife’s handle to secure it in place.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Just like this.
(Black Scout Survival)

Once the knife is nice and snug, take a ferrocerium rod and strike it up against the knife’s blade. This will create a spark and, as long as your dry kindling is close enough, it will catch the spark and ignite.

Like always, provide oxygen and add kindling to feed the fire.

Note: Please remember to always create fires in a safe area regardless of your physical injuries. You don’t want to become a burn victim as well.

Check out Black Scout Survival‘s video below to get a complete breakdown on this single-handed fire starting technique.

MIGHTY TRENDING

Inside a ‘Guardian Angel’ rescue mission in Afghanistan

It’s dark. The air is heavy, filled with Afghanistan smoke and dust. On the flight line at Bagram Airfield, an Army CH-47F Chinook helicopter waits, beating thunder with its blades.


An 83rd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron Guardian Angel team, which consists of pararescuemen and combat rescue officers, runs out and boards the helicopter. As the Guardian Angels settle into their seats, the helicopter takes off against the night sky over the mountainous terrain.

Also read: Here’s what happens when the Air Force’s computer nerds hang out with pararescuemen

During the ensuing flight, two Operation Freedom’s Sentinel teams will conduct a personnel recovery exercise, testing their capability to work together as they extricate simulated casualties from a downed aircraft. The Army and the Air Force are working together to execute personnel recovery.

‘Personnel recovery is a no-fail strategic mission’

“Personnel recovery is a no-fail strategic mission,” said Air Force Maj. Robert Wilson, 83rd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron commander. “The interoperability between the U.S. Army and the U.S. Air Force, by way of the CH-47F, has enabled our Guardian Angel teams to effectively conduct a wide variety of personnel rescue operations in ways not previously attainable.”

Executing missions with CH-47Fs gives the seven-man Guardian Angel team unique advantages; such as an increased capacity to recover a larger number of isolated personnel and the ability to fly further and higher than previous platforms allowed.

“This partnership strengthens the resolve of those fighting on the ground and in the air to fight harder and longer, knowing that someone will always have their back,” Wilson said.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Air Force pararescuemen, assigned to the 83rd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron, set up a perimeter during a training scenario with members of the Army Aviation Reaction Force, Task Force Brawler on the flight line at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Feb. 22, 2018. (Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Gregory Brook)

The Chinook is a twin-turbine, tandem-rotor, heavy-lift transport helicopter with a useful load of up to 25,000 pounds. With its high altitude and payload capability, the CH-47F is vital to overseas operations, such as in Afghanistan. Its capabilities include medical evacuation, aircraft recovery, parachute drops, disaster relief and combat search and rescue.

Related: 15 years later, Pararescueman awarded Air Force Cross for valor

“I’ve been flying CH-47 models for 22 years,” said Army Chief Warrant Officer 3 Shawn Miller, a CH-47F pilot with the South Carolina National Guard. “This is an unprecedented tasking. Never in its history has an Army unit been tasked to provide dedicated aviation assets and crew to conduct joint personnel recovery operations.”

Miller’s team is also joined by the Illinois Army National Guard.

The CH-47F model, with its enhanced capabilities, combined with the combat search and rescue mission set, allows the team to transport more personnel and essential equipment higher, further distances, and offer longer on the scene station times than ever before, Miller added.

Joint operations

Joint operations between services capitalize on the unique skillsets each branch brings to the fight.

For missions in Afghanistan, because of its high altitudes and current enemy threats, the benefits seem to outweigh the risks of using a different system. Especially in terms of the varied mission sets required of the personnel recovery enterprise.

More: Airman seeks to rejoin pararescue team despite loss of leg

The pararescue team also specializes in cold weather/avalanche or snow and ice rescue, collapsed structure/confined space extrication, or many different forms of jump operations in static-line or free-fall configuration.

Using the teams to their full capacity is all about strengthening the resolve of those fighting on the ground and in the air.

“Critical to the warfighter is knowing that a highly trained and capable PR force is standing ready at a moment’s notice, willingly placing themselves in harm’s way … so that others may live,” Wilson said.

Tactical

7 valuable tips on how to pass Marine Scout Swimmers course

The Basic Scout Swimmers Course is a three-week evaluation with the mission of providing Marines with the ability to launch boat raids from land, sea, or air.


A scout swimmer’s primary duty is to swim ahead, secure a beach landing site, and signal for follow-on forces. They can also be used as a reconnaissance force should the need arise.

These are some well-trained Marines and the course is not to be taken lightly.

Related: 7 things you didn’t know about the Marine Jungle Warfare Training Center

1. Be able to swim… obviously.

More specifically, be able to fin. First class swim qualifications are required, but having the endurance to fin as long and as far as possible is invaluable during the course.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Just keep swimming. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Abbey Perria)

2. Lean with it or get rocked by it.

Coxswain, the guys who drive zodiacs (low-profile rubber boats), are generally a thrill-seeking breed and they are encouraged to push the limits of speed during swimmer insertions. They will absolutely try to sling you off their boat during the course, so hang on and learn to anticipate the turns or swim much further to the beach landing site, or BLS.

3. Get used to being wet and sandy.

One of the first things you’ll do when you hit the BLS is the “sugar cookie.” The “sugar cookie” is when you roll around and toss sand all over your wet body, it sticks to you, and it becomes your camouflage. It’s strikingly similar to what happens to cat sh*t in a litter box.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Thanks, bro! (Photo by Erik S. Brooks Jr)

4. Buy some black Converse.

Swimmers will use fins to swim to shore but, once there, you will need to remove your fins and secure the beach. Black Converse are a more practical footwear for running compared to fin booties. The Marines with green converse have endured the ocean for a long time.

5. Dummy chords are not for dummies.

Don’t bring anything into the ocean that you want to keep. If you cannot avoid bringing something important, dummy chord it. Dummy chording is a method of securing items to one’s body using 550-chord. This doesn’t guarantee the item won’t be lost at sea, but it certainly helps.

6 Be a team player.

Securing a beach is a team effort and it is a pass-or-fail scenario. So, do your best to enhance your interpersonal skills… or, basically, don’t be a dick.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Teamwork with my friends. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. R. Logan Kyle)

Also Read: How to make the best steak ever, according to a Marine chef

7. Do not quit.

This seems obvious, but people do it. Those people are not Scout Swimmers. Finish strong, my friend.

MIGHTY TRENDING

Army ditches search for 7.62 battle rifle — for now

Multiple sources are reporting that the Army has put on hold its search for a new battle rifle to field to troops in overseas operations that fires a heavier round than the service’s current weapon.


The Army has been facing pressure from Congress and some in the service to field a larger caliber rifle to troops fighting ISIS and other militants who use Russian-made weapons and body armor. Defense officials have said the American M4 carbine and its variants fire a 5.56mm round that cannot penetrate new Russian-designed armor and that the answer was to field an immediate supply of rifles chambered in 7.62mm.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
The M110 SASS is the Army’s current 7.62 compact sniper rifle. Some service leaders pushed a version of this rifle for more deployed troops to penetrate Russian-made body armor. (U.S. Air Force photo/Justin Connaher)

“We recognize the 5.56mm round, there is a type of body armor it doesn’t penetrate. … Adversarial states are selling it for $250,” Army chief Gen. Mark Milley told lawmakers in May. “There’s a need, an operational need [for a 7.62 rifle]. We think we can do it relatively quickly.”

But less than two months after the Army issued a request from industry to provide up to 50,000 7.62 battle rifles, sources say the service has pulled the plug on the program, citing internal disagreements on the true need for the rifle and cost savings. The shelving comes as the Pentagon is finalizing a broad-based report on the military’s small arms ammunition and what the future needs of the services are given the existing threats.

Some insiders say the service is leaning toward a rifle chambered in an entirely new caliber that has better penetration and fires more accurately at longer distances, and that pursuing an “interim” solution is a waste of time and resources.

“There are systems out there today, on the shelf, that with some very minor modifications could be adapted to munitions that we’re developing at Fort Benning that could be used to penetrate these SAPI plates that our adversaries are developing,” Milley said in May. “It’s not necessarily an either or proposition on that one. I think there’s weapons out there that we can get, in the right caliber, that can enhance the capability of the infantry soldier.”

Other experts say most hard body armor can withstand multiple hits from both 5.56 rounds and 7.62 ones, so spending limited funds on a new rifle in a caliber that current body armor can already resist is simply spending good money after bad.

So for now, it looks like the Army is going to stick with its M4 for now. But with the service holding off on buying an interim 7.62 rifle, it could be that soldiers might be looking at a whole new rifle platform a lot sooner than they thought.

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10 tips for succeeding at BUD/S, according to a Navy SEAL

When sailors hit the Navy SEAL training grinder, they’ll undergo what’s considered the hardest military training on earth in attempts to earn the Trident. Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) training uses the sandy beaches of Coronado, California, to push candidates beyond their mental and physical limits to see if they can endure and be welcomed into the Special Warfare community.

Roughly 75 percent of all BUD/S candidates drop out of training, leaving many to wonder what, exactly, it takes to survive the program and graduate. Well, former Navy SEAL Jeff Nichols is here to break it down and give you a few tips for finding success at BUD/S.


The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6

SEAL candidates cover themselves in sand during surf passage on Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, California.

(Photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Michael Russell)

Diversify your training

According to Nichols, the ability to sustain yourself through various types of physical training will only help your odds of succeeding at BUD/S. Incorporate various exercise types, variable rest periods, and a wide array of resistances into your training regimen.

Get massages

When candidates aren’t in training, it’s crucial that they heal themselves up. Massages improve the body’s circulation and can cut down recovery time. That being said, avoid deep-tissue massages. That type of intense treatment can actually extend your healing time.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6

Vice President Joe Biden places a hand on the shoulder of one of the Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) candidates while speaking to them on the beach at Naval Special Warfare Center during his visit to San Diego, Calif.

(Photo by MC2 Dominique M. Lasco)

Find sleep wherever possible

If you can avoid staying up late, you should. Nichols encourages candidates to take naps whenever possible. Even if its only a quick, 20-minute snooze, get that rest in as often as possible.

Stay away from smoking and drinking alcohol

Both substances can prevent a candidate from performing at their best during their time at BUD/S. Smoking limits personal endurance. Alcohol dehydrates — which is especially harmful in an environment where every drop of clean water counts.

Know that nobody gives a sh*t

Ultimately, the BUD/S instructors don’t care if you make it through the training. Don’t think anyone will hold your hand as the intensity ramps up.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6

Sailors enrolled in the BUD/S course approach the shore during an over-the-beach exercise at San Clemente Island, California.

(Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Kyle D. Gahlau)

Surround yourself with good people

It’s easy to quit BUD/S and it’s challenging to push yourself onward. Surrounding yourself with good people who are in training for the right reasons will help you through the darkest moments.

Take advantage of your days off

Although you only have roughly 2 days of rest time, take advantage of them to the fullest and heal up as much as you can. Eat healthily and clear your mind by getting off-base as much as possible.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6

A Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL instructor is about to show a member of BUD/S Class 244 just how hard it can be to rescue a drowning victim when the “victim” comes at you with a vengeance during lifesaving training at the Naval Special Warfare Center.

(Photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class John DeCoursey)

Trust the BUD/S process

According to Nichols, the BUD/S process doesn’t fail. Listen to the instructors as they tell you how to properly negotiate individual training obstacles as a team. They all have proven experience, you just need to listen.

Don’t take anything personal

The instructors will slowly chip away at your self-confidence with the aim of getting you to quit. Brush off those remarks. Remember, this is part of the test.

BUD/S is considered a fair environment

Nichols believes that the program is a fair method of getting only the strongest candidates through the training and onto SEAL teams. It’s up to the SEAL instructors to put out the best possible product.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsnXb4xAcWw

Tactical

This is how Marines set up ‘vehicle checkpoints’ in enemy territory

In many Hollywood war movies, directors film scenes where terrorists barrel down the street and aim their speeding vehicles at ground troops in hopes of killing as many as possible. But instead, the ground forces open fire on the incoming car or truck and eventually score a kill shot.


Well, that’s not too far from reality — sh*t happens.

The enemy will do just about anything to transport weapons, militia, and sensitive information any way they can — so setting up a proper vehicle checkpoint is crucial.

Related: 6 reasons why it’s not a good idea to attack a Marine FOB

So check out how Marines set up their vehicle checkpoints while in enemy territory

Set up an overwatch position

Marines hardly stay in a prolonged position of any type without having an extra set of eyeballs stationed on the high ground watching over their brother-in-arms down below. This overwatch position helps to spot any potentially dangerous activities well before it gets to their boys.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
This Marine watches for enemy activity from an overwatch position.

Strength in numbers

Typically, infantry Marines rarely leave the wire to conduct static checkpoints without having enough eyes to see in all directions. Being deployed in a country where the majority of the population hates you, it’s a good idea to have as many “trigger pullers” as possible on deck — you never know when sh*t is going to pop off.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
These Marines stand close by one another as they conduct a vehicle checkpoint in Afghanistan. (Source: Wikipedia Commons)

The serpentine

Since the enemy has been known to mow pedestrians down in the street, allied forces can quickly lay down concertina wire to form a serpentine style obstacle course intended to slow vehicles down before entering the checkpoint.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
The classic serpentine obstacle.

If the vehicles fail to stop and drive over the concertina wire, the strong metallic coil wraps around the tires and aisles, rendering the car useless.

Also Read: 14 images that humorously recall your first firefight

Stopping the vehicles

The ground troops usually speak — or carry stop signs — in the native language, signaling to the potential bad guys to halt when they draw closer. Once they do come to a complete stop, the Marines will allow all the passengers to step out as they search for illegal materials.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
Marine conduct a vehicle checkpoint while in Afghanistan. (Source: Wikipedia Commons)

Retina scans

After the passengers are removed, they’re placed under strict Marine supervision as their vehicle is carefully inspected. A Marine with a specialized camera called a “Bat and Hiide, ” or biometric automated toolset and handheld interagency identity detection equipment will take a retina scan of the passenger’s eyes.

This system will search a data base and reveal the passenger’s identity, as terrorists are known for using multiple aliases.

The eyes never lie.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
The Bat and Hiide system.

To detain or not detain

If the vehicle and its passengers check out clean, the occupants are free to go. If not, they will be detained for further questioning.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
These Marines detain a potential bad guy in Iraq. (Source: 2nd MarDiv)

Do you have any interesting vehicle checkpoints stories? Comment below.

MIGHTY TRENDING

Analysis: The Army has a range problem, but it’s not because of the 5.56 round

Back in May, the Army Times ran a piece announcing that the Army was officially looking to replace the M16 family of weapons and the 5.56mm cartridge with a weapon system that is both more reliable, and has greater range.


As the article states, they’re taking a hard look at “intermediate rounds,” or rounds with diameters between 6.5 and 7mm, that have greater range and ballistics than either the 5.56 x 45 or the 7.62 x 51, both of which are old and outdated compared to the crop of rounds that have sprung up in the last decade or so. The thinking is, with these newer rounds, you can easily match the superior stopping power of the 7.62 without sacrificing the magazine capacity afforded by the tiny 5.56 cartridge, while still giving troops better range and accuracy.

Coupled with a more reliable platform, preferably one that doesn’t jam up if you so much as think about sand getting in it, this could potentially be a game changer for the US Army.

Now, me personally, I think this is great. I’ve had a chance to play around with a couple of these intermediate calibers, and I quickly fell in love. I’m not one of those guys who despises the 5.56, because, for what it is, it’s not a bad little round. It’s got decent ballistics out to a decent range, and you can carry a lot of them. But, when you compare it to something like the 6.5 Creedmore, one of the rounds reportedly being considered as a replacement, it’s like comparing a Mazda Miata to a Lamborghini Aventador.

And hey, a new rifle would be pretty great, too. The M16 platform has been around for ages, and while its modular nature means that it’s endlessly adaptable, the direct gas impingement operating system is a right pain in the ass. Advances in firearm technology over the past half century have given us plenty of options, and it’s high time we took a look at them.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Qujuan Baptiste uses smoke as concealment during a stress shoot at the 2017 Army Materiel Command’s Best Warrior Competition July 18, 2017, at Camp Atterbury, Indiana. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Teddy Wade)

But giving soldiers a more reliable weapon with greater range is kinda pointless if we don’t address one of the Army’s most persistent and glaring faults: its marksmanship program sucks. There’s no one part of the thing we can point to as being problematic. It’s not just the BRM taught at Basic, or the qualification tables. The whole thing, from start to finish, really, really, sucks.

What’s the point of giving soldiers a shiny, new rifle if they can’t hit the broadside of a barn with the one they’ve got?

Now, before you break out the pitchforks and your Expert qualification badges, sit down and think about what I’m saying. Unless your MOS directly involves shooting things in the face, when was the last time you went to the range during the workday for something other than qualification? When was the last time you broke out the rifles for anything other than to qualify, or to clean them for inspection?

For most of you, that answer will be either the last time you deployed, or never. And that’s a huge problem.

Over the last ten-and-a-half years in the North Carolina Army National Guard, I’ve spent more time being told not to kill myself or rape people than how to shoot. I don’t have a problem with qualification myself; I can reliably shoot high sharpshooter to low expert. But I also make a point to shoot recreationally whenever I can. Not everyone has that option, and plenty of folks who do don’t take advantage of it.

For most folks, the entirety of their marksmanship training will consist of three weeks in Basic, the few days out of the year when they go qualify, and maybe a few days or even a week or two of extra training when they mobilize. And that simply isn’t enough.

The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Qujuan Baptiste uses a vehicle as a barricade and fires at multiple targets during a stress shoot scenario at the 2017 Army Materiel Command’s Best Warrior Competition July 18, 2017, at Camp Atterbury, Indiana. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Teddy Wade)

Nevermind that the Army’s qualification system is stupid and outdated. Shooting static popup targets at ranges between 50-300 meters is a good start, but to rely on that as the sole measure of a soldier’s ability to engage the enemy is insane. According to the Army Times article linked up at the top, one of the driving forces behind looking for a new round is the fact that something like half of all firefights occurred at ranges greater than 300 meters. Meanwhile, your average soldier doesn’t even bother shooting at the 300 meter targets, because they know they can’t hit the damn things.

If the Army’s quest for a new sidearm is any indication, the search for a new rifle will take at least a decade, untold millions of dollars, a half-dozen Congressional inquiries and investigations, and probably a few lawsuits before they settle on the final product. Which means there’s plenty of time to teach soldiers how to shoot before the new gear ever starts filtering its way through the system.

As a starting point, come up with a comprehensive training plan that utilizes Basic Rifle Marksmanship, then build on that foundation throughout the soldier’s career. Get soldiers to the range more often. Update the qualification tables to more accurately represent the threat they’re expected to face. Enforce qualification standards like PT standards, and offer regular remedial training for folks who fail to meet those standards.

Or just carry on before and put a shiny new rifle in the hands of a kid who barely knows which end goes bang. I watched a guy from out battalion’s Forward Support Company shoot a 6 this year. That’s good enough, right?

Tactical

Some amazing changes are in the works for US infantry

On Feb. 8, Defense Secretary James Mattis, probably everyone’s favorite human Marine, sent a memo (below) to top Department of Defense officials regarding the establishment of a Close Combat Lethality Task Force, which will improve “the combat preparedness, lethality, survivability, and resiliency of our Nation’s ground close-combat formations.”


The new uniform most sailors will wear every day was actually developed by SEAL Team 6
It’s been called the ‘Top Gun’ for grunts, which is a movie I would definitely watch.

Mattis makes the compelling point that these close-combat formations — AKA grunts — make up 90% of our casualties, and therefore deserve to be modernized, better equipped, and expertly prepared.

His task force is the solution — or at least a solution, and potentially an awesome one.

Breaking Defense points out that the task force will concentrate on training, personnel, and policy. Infantry will mirror special operations in its elite training tactics and its selection process.

Also read: 6 ways the infantry prepares you to be in special ops

“We know from experience…that intelligent soldiers are far more effective and far less likely to become casualties,” said Bob Scales, a leading infantry advisor for Mattis.

It’s still early in the stages of making effective change (per Mattis’ memo, the first step the task force will have taken is to identify existing problems to address and lay out the roles and responsibilities of those involved in solving said problems. But there are plenty of suggestions from the military community (no surprise there).

Training with drones, improved close-quarter and subterranean tactics, and arming troops with advanced technology (think robots and self-breathing apparatuses) are a few topics of speculation. Dialogue about personnel policy changes include everything from over-manning squads (grimly, to anticipate casualties) and better collaboration between branches.

Related: How Mattis is the stabilizing force of the Trump White House

Ultimately, the fact that SECDEF is focusing his attention on the selection, training, and deployment of our infantrymen is a strong indication of his determination to improve the way the United States fights its wars and his commitment to improving America’s global reach — but equally important is the emphasis on human life in the equation of warfighting.

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